When it comes to fleet management, the E in ESG can carry a bit more weight. With transportation being one of the greatest contributors to global greenhouse gas emissions, environmental preservation is becoming increasingly important across the industry. The practice of ESG at a higher level helps fleets to stay accountable for their negative and positive impacts.

BI helps fleets to futureproof by creating a reliable and repeatable management strategy that is flexible to change. With the fleet industry changing so rapidly today, this helps managers look toward long-term success, focusing on cost-reduction opportunities and sustainable resource management.

One of the greatest benefits of implementing business intelligence is the ability to turn disconnected data systems into actionable insights. Once fleet data is streamlined and cleaned, BI bridges the gap between the initial point of data collection to seeing data-driven results.

Starting with reliable, high-quality data is the first step for successful reporting. This gives your organization a full view of what’s going on within, share reports with full confidence and make smarter, data-backed business decisions. To get to this point, however, data quality starts with unified data streams, error-free information and appropriate storage.

The common goal of fleet sustainability is twofold. First, to adopt practices that protect the wellbeing and future of the world around us. Second, to ensure the future success of your organization. This is appealing for organizations striving to be more conscientious with their practices while still reducing waste and costs internally.

Recently, in partnership with Consumer’s Energy, we ran a survey to learn more about how fleets are changing their take-home policies (if at all), especially as we exit a pandemic and move into a new year.

Charging infrastructure is a crucial element of electrification that many leave as an afterthought to EV adoption. Installation of EV infrastructure can take up to months, and fleet managers must consider their charging strategy, budget, available space and the infrastructure company they will work with.

How does the range of an electric vehicle and an ICE vehicle differ?

EVs aren’t the only vehicles that suffer from ice cold, winter conditions. ICEVs face their own challenges in the cold that weaken vehicle performance and fuel efficiency.

In order to know where fleet costs can be cut, it is essential to fully understand each vehicles’ total cost of ownership (TCO). This number is sum of all costs associated with acquiring a vehicle and keeping it operating throughout its lifecycle.