Priscilla Valdez | Content Specialist

Priscilla Valdez is a content specialist at Utilimarc. She has over 7 years' experience storytelling and copywriting in various industries. She enjoys sharing industry insights through writing that is compelling and dynamic. She is an avid traveler and foodie, so when she’s not working you can find her hunting down cheap flights or browsing the New York Times Cooking section.


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Alternative fuels are on the top of many fleet managers’ minds these days. Fleets are exploring new ways to get the job done while remaining operationally efficient, cost effective and sustainable. As a result, many managers are introducing a mix of electric, hydrogen, and natural gas-powered vehicles into their fleet to work alongside traditional gas and diesel ICEVs.

As EV production struggles to keep up and delivery dates keep being pushed back, many fleets are left wondering whether their sustainability goals are even feasible in the immediate future. One potential solution is the use of natural gas to power light- to heavy-duty vehicles.

Choosing to charge EVs on-site or at drivers’ homes each come with their own pros, cons and general considerations from infrastructure installation to electricity costs to charging schedules.

In addition to extreme temperatures and battery degradation, EV drivers are noticing another phenomenon affecting their battery performance and fuel efficiency. Phantom drain, also known as vampire drain, occurs when energy is lost from a battery when the vehicle is not in use.

Charging infrastructure is a crucial element of electrification that many leave as an afterthought to EV adoption. Installation of EV infrastructure can take up to months, and fleet managers must consider their charging strategy, budget, available space and the infrastructure company they will work with.

For those opting to phase out ICEVs, the go-to alternative is typically electric vehicles. However, another technology being explored and invested into is hydrogen-powered vehicles (FCEVs).

Creating a charging strategy is an essential step of electrification that many do not realize should be done well in advance of receiving new EVs. Fleets looking to build an entire charging station with several ports for fleets can be looking at months of installation time.

Santa Monica’s Zero Emissions Delivery Zone is the first LEZ in the country. The initiative targets last-mile delivery vehicles and is pushing for electrification and micromobility in last-mile delivery.

There is more internal and external pressure than ever before for organizations to make their practices sustainable and to find different ways of doing so. This can mean something different for each distinct organization, especially when it comes to how they approach it.

Last month, Utilimarc released the results of a survey on Greenhouse Gas Reporting. The survey was created to understand how leading North American fleets were track and reporting on their progress towards goals set on emissions reduction – of which the commercial fleet industry makes up 35 percent of GHG emissions worldwide.