Priscilla Valdez | Content Specialist

Priscilla Valdez is a content specialist at Utilimarc. She has over 7 years' experience storytelling and copywriting in various industries. She enjoys sharing industry insights through writing that is compelling and dynamic. She is an avid traveler and foodie, so when she’s not working you can find her hunting down cheap flights or browsing the New York Times Cooking section.


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An emissions profile is a powerful tool for supporting fleet sustainability initiatives. The profile closely details a fleet or organization’s total carbon emissions within a certain period of time. This profile includes emissions from activities ranging from energy generation, fuel consumption and other daily operations.

With the adoption of EVs, there can be a learning curve to the distinct technologies, metrics and KPIs involved. BI can help managers to track charge events, energy usage and MPGe in addition to their original ICEV metrics, all in one place.

The common goal of fleet sustainability is twofold. First, to adopt practices that protect the wellbeing and future of the world around us. Second, to ensure the future success of your organization. This is appealing for organizations striving to be more conscientious with their practices while still reducing waste and costs internally.

Sustainability is interwoven into futureproofing for many reasons. At its core, the idea and goal of sustainability is to carry out our actions and meet our needs without jeopardizing the ability of future generations doing the same. This is essentially the same goal as futureproofing, no?

For fleets that have kept waiting patiently, this year has brought an exciting onset of “firsts” in the EV market. This is great news for different types of fleets, from emergency services to shipping to utilities, who now have one more option to help future-proof operations and meet long-term sustainability goals.

Nuclear power suppliers today face a challenge that has remained unresolved for decades: nuclear waste. This waste can remain radioactive for hundreds of thousands of years and can contaminate the environment if not disposed of properly.

While fleets are concerned with the procurement of EVs, energy suppliers are concerned with ensuring the grid can even support such a large increase in demand. The US Department of Energy estimates that electricity consumption could go up by 38 percent by 2050 due to the transition to EVs. The challenge now is generating enough clean energy to support this change.

Alternative fuels are on the top of many fleet managers’ minds these days. Fleets are exploring new ways to get the job done while remaining operationally efficient, cost effective and sustainable. As a result, many managers are introducing a mix of electric, hydrogen, and natural gas-powered vehicles into their fleet to work alongside traditional gas and diesel ICEVs.

As EV production struggles to keep up and delivery dates keep being pushed back, many fleets are left wondering whether their sustainability goals are even feasible in the immediate future. One potential solution is the use of natural gas to power light- to heavy-duty vehicles.

Charging infrastructure is a crucial element of electrification that many leave as an afterthought to EV adoption. Installation of EV infrastructure can take up to months, and fleet managers must consider their charging strategy, budget, available space and the infrastructure company they will work with.